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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

The TWRA needs your help in collecting invasive carp. If you catch a small carp, nine inches or less, the agency is asking that you put it on ice or freeze it and contact them immediately. If you are unable to keep the fish, the TWRA asks you to submit photos of the fish in hand and send it to them. You can contact the TWRA by phone at 731-423-5725 or toll-free at 1-800-372-3928, by fax at 731-423-6483, or by email at ans.twra@tn.gov.

San Diego County Agriculture Weights and Measures (California).

New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry.

Georgia Forestry Commission.

Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.

Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources.

Wyoming State Forestry Division.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado in September 2013. This marks the first time EAB has been detected in Colorado as well as the first detection of EAB in any western state. EAB has not been detected in Wyoming. See Forest Health Management for related EAB information.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic beetle discovered in the United States in 2002 near Detroit, Mich. Since then, it has spread to 35 states and five Canadian provinces. Mississippi and Florida are the only states east of the Mississippi River that have reported no EAB infestations to date. Originally from Asia, the EAB is believed to have entered the country on infested solid wood packing material or wooden pallets. The MFC will be conducting EAB surveys in multiple counties across the state later this year. The public is encouraged to be on the lookout for EAB signs and report them to the MFC immediately. Click here for more information about the emerald ash borer.

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

The emerald ash borer, a severe insect pest of ash trees, was confirmed in Webster Parish in February 2015, making Louisiana the 25th state to confirm the presence of this beetle. In 2014, the LDAF started a "Don’t Move Firewood" campaign which is geared toward educating people about the risks of transporting pests to other locations where some can do harm. It is best to purchase firewood not more than 10 miles from where it will be burned.

South Carolina Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer, a beetle pest that has devastated ash trees throughout the eastern United States, was officially detected in Greenville, Oconee and Spartanburg counties in August 2017. According to a Clemson University press release, the beetles were found Aug. 3 during a routine check of Emerald Ash Borer traps and confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In response to the discovery of EAB in the Upstate, the State Crop Pest Commission likely will establish a quarantine area involving at least the three affected counties; it is also possible the quarantine could be expanded to additional counties or even the entire state.

Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Since the emerald ash borer's initial introduction into the United States, it has been spread to many areas of the country by campers and homeowners who unknowingly moved infested firewood to uninfested areas where the beetles emerged and infested new ash trees. You can help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer into Kansas by not moving firewood across county lines. When buying wood for your home, buy only locally grown and harvested firewood. When camping, buy your firewood near your destination and burn all that you bring. If you suspect emerald ash borer on your property please call 785-564-6698 or e-mail your name, address, phone number and pictures of the suspect tree to ppwc@kda.ks.gov.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Division of Plant Industry.

Contains fact sheets and other resources for Mediterranean fruit fly, Mexican fruit fly, and Oriental fruit fly

Collier Soil and Water Conservation District (Florida).

Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.

The Emerald ash borer was first found in Connecticut during the week of July 16, 2012. Since that first find in Prospect, EAB has been found in many other parts of the state, particularly in towns in central and western Connecticut. DEEP, the CT Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA APHIS PPQ and the U.S. Forest Service are working together with local partners to slow the spread of the insect and to take steps to minimize its impact. This will be a long-term effort on the part of all involved.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for related information

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

DNR and partners are working to eradicate a wild population of Argentine black and white tegus in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia. Growing up to 4 feet long and weighing 10 pounds or more, this lizard native to South America is an invasive species that threatens Georgia wildlife. Early detection, rapid response and public involvement are key to stopping tegus in this area. In Toombs and Tattnall, DNR's Wildlife Resources Division, the U.S. Geological Survey and Georgia Southern University are trapping tegus, tracking sightings and assessing the population. Tell DNR when you see a tegu in the wild, alive or dead. These reports help biologists document occurrences and respond effectively. Note the location, take a photo if possible and report the sighting:

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry has announced a formal quarantine on emerald ash borer (EAB) and material that may harbor it. Quarantine Area: The quarantine area includes all of York County and the northeastern corner of Aroostook County. The quarantine boundaries were drawn to include a buffer on those towns where EAB had been detected. EAB was found in northern Aroostook County in May 2018 and in western York County in September 2018. In 2019, EAB was detected in Portland, ME. An emergency order is in place to limit movement of infested ash from parts of Cumberland County. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.