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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
The Indiana Terrestrial Plant Rule (312 IAC 18-3-25) designates 44 species of plants as invasive pests. This rule makes it illegal to sell, gift, barter, exchange, distribute, transport, or introduce these plants in the State of Indiana. This rule goes into effect in two stages. As of April 18, 2019, it is illegal to introduce plant species on this list not already found in Indiana. Plant species already in trade will be prohibited from sale one year later (April 18, 2020).
New Hampshire Code of Administrative Rules.
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
A regulation was adopted in 2014 that prohibits or regulates the possession, transport, importation, sale, purchase and introduction of select invasive species. The purpose of this regulation is to help control invasive species, a form of biological pollution, by reducing the introduction of new and spread of existing populations.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Oklahoma Administrative Code.
Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

See also: Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control for more information about the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations

Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.

Michigan.gov.

Some invasive species are legally designated by the State of Michigan as either "prohibited" or "restricted." If a species is prohibited or restricted, it is unlawful to possess, introduce, import, sell or offer that species for sale as a live organism, except under certain circumstances.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Missouri Department of Agriculture.

Montana Department of Agriculture.
See also: Noxious Weeds for more resources
Nevada Department of Agriculture.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
See also: Invasive Plants for more resources

New Mexico Department of Agriculture.

The Director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture has selected the following plant species to be targeted as noxious weeds for control or eradication pursuant to the Noxious Weed Management Act of 1998 (updated from 2009). This list does not include every plant species with the potential to negatively affect the state's environment or economy.
See also: Noxious Weed Information for more resources.