An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 20 of 308

Search Help
DOI. NPS. Biscayne National Park.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

DOI. FWS. Invasive Species Program.
Environmental Protection Agency.

USDA. APHIS. Veterinary Services.

USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
See also: Conservation Practice Information for more job sheets

USDA. Forest Service. Pacific Northwest Region and Pacific Northwest Research Station.

DHHS. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Veterinary Services.

DOI. National Park Service.

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets.

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Fact Sheets for Invasive Exotic Plants for more fact sheets

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
DOI. USGS. Columbia Environmental Research Center.

USDA. APHIS. Wildlife Services.

The nutria (Myocastor coypus), a large, semi-aquatic rodent native to South America, was originally brought to the United States in 1889 for its fur. When the nutria fur market collapsed in the 1940s, thousands of nutria escaped or were released into the wild by ranchers who could no longer afford to feed and house them. While nutria devour weeds and overabundant vegetation, they also destroy native aquatic vegetation, crops, and wetland areas. Recognized in the United States as an invasive wildlife species, nutria have been found in at least 20 States and most recently in California. The nutria’s relatively high reproductive rate, combined with a lack of population controls, helped the species to spread.

USDA. FS. Rocky Mountain Research Station. Fire Sciences Laboratory.