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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
This guide contains a collection of hands-on activities that are easy for teachers to use in the classroom and in the schoolyard. The curriculum is designed for kindergarten through 12th grade and most activities are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards. The guide is available to all formal and non-formal educators online at www.gaeppc.org and through workshops offered in the metro-Atlanta area. Classroom teachers, park naturalists, environmental education specialists, and others can adapt these activities to fit easily into their programs.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

In 2010, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho launched a tri-state outreach campaign to inform the public about the dangers of moving firewood to Pacific Northwest forests. The campaign, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture, closely followed the messaging of the national Don't Move Firewood campaign, which recommends buy firewood that was cut locally, preferably within the county or region of where it will be burned. The tri-state outreach campaign, Buy It Where You Burn It, encouraged good campfire practices with branded posters, billboards, and playing cards located at rest stops and state parks.

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force.

Task Force members, ex-officio members, Regional Panels, States, and other entities such as Sea Grant have conducted workshops, created traveling information displays, exhibits, pamphlets, information sheets, wallet identification cards, videos, websites and innumerable other public education venues for distribution across the country./p>

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Hawaii Invasive Species Council.

Hawaii Invasive Species Awareness Month (February) seeks to promote information sharing and public engagement in what the Hawaii State Legislature has declared "the single greatest threat to Hawaii's economy and natural environment and to the health and lifestyle of Hawaii’s people."

Oklahoma Invasive Plant Council.

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers.

Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers is an ANS Task Force public awareness campaign intended to educate the public on aquatic nuisance species (ANS) and stop or reduce unintended spread of ANS to new habitat by recreational activities such as boating, fishing, swimming, waterfowl hunting, SCUBA diving or snorkeling, windsurfing, seaplane operations, personal watercraft use, and recreational bait harvesting. This campaign is supported by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers.

Welcome to the Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers! Marketing Showroom where you can find examples of existing products to help achieve your goals of building awareness and increasing engagement. See also Graphics Library for more outreach resources.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

Prevention and early detection of invasive species depends upon the help of the public, industry partners, and policymakers. The council has helped developed tools and regional messaging that have successfully raised public awareness about invasive species, their impacts on native ecosystems, and the steps people can take to prevent the spread of invasive species. Campaigns include:

  • Buy it Where you Burn it
  • Clean, Drain, Dry
  • Don’t Let it Loose
  • Don’t Pack a Pest
  • Play, Clean, Go
  • Squeal on Pigs!