An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 181 to 200 of 264

Search Help

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

We need your help! If you think you have found an invasive species in Washington, please let us know by reporting it.

Australian Invasive Species Council.

A new report has identified an international 'bug superhighway' capable of carrying a large variety of environmentally destructive overseas insects into Australia. The study, led by Monash University, rated the environmental harm being caused by 100 of the worst overseas insect species and recommends a string of actions to keep them out of Australia. The most dominant group of invasive insects by far are the hymenopteran insects – ants, bees and wasps – making them the world's most environmentally harmful invasive insect species.

"Our report found that environmentally harmful bugs, beetles, ants and moths are most likely to hitch a ride into Australia along an international bug superhighway made up of imported plants, nursery material and the timber trade," said report author Professor Melodie McGeoch from Monash University. The report identifies the international trade in cut flowers and foliage as a high-risk pathway for more than 70 of the species studied. Invasive Species Council CEO Andrew Cox said this is the first time Australian and international scientists have comprehensively analysed which invasive insects overseas are doing the most environmental harm and could therefore threaten Australia's natural environment if they breach the nation's borders.

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.
There are many great resources available for educators and youth to learn about invasive species in British Columbia.
Rhode Island Invasive Species Council.
The Rhode Island Invasive Species Council is an outreach program of the Rhode Island Natural History Survey, The Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station, and The University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension.
Saskatchewan Invasive Species Council (Canada).
Saskatchewan Invasive Species Council (Canada).
Southeast Exotic Plant Pest Council.
The mission of the South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council is to support the management of invasive exotic plants in South Carolina's natural areas by providing a forum for the exchange of scientific, educational and technical information.