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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas
Ohio Invasive Plants Council.
See also: Invasive Plants of Ohio for worst invasive plant species identified in Ohio's natural areas

Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.

Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council.

Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council.

Update: Invasive Zebra Mussels Found in Pets Stores in 21 States (Mar 8, 2021; U.S. Geological Survey Press Release). Agencies, industry in coordinated response to help stores and consumers find and destroy troublesome shellfish.

The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council wishes to inform you of an important invasive species threat that was recently discovered in the U.S. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), which are regarded as one of the most troublesome invasive species in North America, have been discovered within a variety of moss ball products designed for aquarium use, including products being sold and used in aquariums in stores in multiple states, including Oregon, Washington and Florida.

Specifically identified in a report from the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, a release from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and a press release from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, PIJAC urges you to take immediate action to inspect your fish tanks and take action as necessary. For more information on how to dispose of recently-purchased moss balls, see Zebra Mussel Disposal from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Australian Invasive Species Council.

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Invasive Species Council of California.

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force.

This database was designed to direct users to invasive species experts. The public portion of the database will guide you to a state contact who acts as a filter for information and identifications.

National Invasive Species Council Secretariat.

To better understand the impacts of invasive species on infrastructure managed by the federal government an effort was undertaken by the National Invasive Species Council Secretariat to solicit feedback from those agencies. A questionnaire was sent out to the federal agencies that manage infrastructure to identify the impacts they have observed, how they are managing them, issues they have identified and resource needs. The research demonstrated that impacts from invasive species on federally managed infrastructure range from non-existent to significant. Identified gaps needing improvement include awareness and education of invasive species impacts, limited resources, insufficient policy, and lack of agency support. See also: NISC and NISC Secretariat Products for more resources

National Invasive Species Council.
Maryland Invasive Species Council.
Mid-Atlantic Panel on Aquatic Invasive Species.