An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 181 to 200 of 327

Search Help
National Geographic Society.
Nile perch were introduced to Lake Victoria in the 1950s to boost the fishing industry. The introduction of Nile perch caused an economic boom, but almost caused cichlids, a native fish, to go extinct. Discover the role an invasive species can play in an ecosystem and social system.

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.

Scientific American.
In 1946 the Argentine Navy imported 10 beaver couples from Canada and set them free in Isla Grande, the deep south of Tierra del Fuego, with the intention of "enriching" the native fauna—and the local fur industry. The consequences of such initiative were disastrous: Protected from hunting for 35 years, and devoid of natural predators, the beavers grew over 5,000 times their initial population, caused irreversible changes in the forest ecosystem, and started advancing over the continent. Now, a study published in Chilean Natural History suggests that the demographic explosion of those beavers could be bigger than suspected because it can take years or even decades for local inhabitants to notice the rodents' presence and their impact on the surrounding ecosystems.

National Geographic.

When the expansion of the Panama Canal is completed in 2016, giant ships that now must dock at West Coast ports after crossing the Pacific will be able to deliver cargo directly to ports on the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast. One thing they may be delivering, according to a recent study, is a much larger number of alien species.
Google. YouTube; United States Department of Agriculture.

Time Magazine.

The old saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" was ahead of its time when it comes to invasive species policy."

Google. YouTube; USDA. Agricultural Research Service.
Scientists with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service in central California are using sound to control insects that spread disease in grape vineyards.
Google. YouTube; Honey Bee Health Coalition.
See also: Tools for Varroa Management Playlist for more videos
Google. YouTube; University of Florida. Lee County Extension.
Google. YouTube; Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department.
Google. YouTube; DOC. NOAA. Ocean Today.
Google. YouTube; University of Florida. IFAS. Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants.
Google. YouTube; Assignment Earth.