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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 11 of 11

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Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Minnesota Department of Agriculture.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center.
To determine which pests posed immediate threats, MITPPC undertook an expansive evaluation process. It convened 15 expert panelists, who ultimately identified 124 significant invasive species threatening our state. This panel also identified 17 criteria that could be used to rate species in an objective, computerized ranking system. Criteria included factors like environmental and economic impact, ability to establish and spread and proximity to the state. Rankings are updated regularly, no later than every other year or as new threats emerge on a more urgent basis. The full whitepaper, "Minnesota's Top 124 Terrestrial Invasive Plants and Pests: Priorities for Research (PDF | 1.4 MB)," outlines all prioritization methods and results
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network.