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Invasive Species Resources

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USDA. NRCS. Idaho.

University of Idaho Extension.

Special Note: Formerly part of the Idaho OnePlan project, which was terminated in September 2018.

Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

University of Delaware Cooperative Extension.

Plants for a Livable Delaware is a campaign to identify and promote superior plants that thrive without becoming invasive. Visit the University of Delaware's Extension Program for more information on sustainable landscaping.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.
North Central Soybean Research Program. Soybean Research and Information Initiative.
Scroll and select Distribution to view known distribution of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, in counties in the United States and Canada in selected years from 1957 to 2014.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.

Delaware Department of Agriculture.

The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber. State plant health and forestry officials are providing information, fact sheets, photographs, and links to other resources at Delaware's Spotted Lanternfly resource page. Early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.

Washington Invasive Species Council.
The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states hope the hotline will help them eradicate and curb the spread of feral pigs and provide a better sense of the number of pigs here. See also: Agencies Encourage Reporting of Feral Swine (Nov 21, 2016). The Washington Invasive Species Council, Washington Department of Agriculture, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have issued a news release asking landowners, hikers, hunters, and other recreationists to report feral swine.
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association

Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.

The invasive species education modules will help you become more comfortable with identifying these species in the field. Includes detailed information for terrestrial plants, aquatic plants, crustaceans, fish, insects, mollusks, and pathogens. Each module includes a short ten question quiz at the end to help you assess your newly acquired knowledge.

DOI. United States Geological Survey.

See also: Science Topics for related invasive species issues.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Northern snakeheads (Channa argus), an invasive fish, have recently been confirmed in Delaware waters. Three adult snakeheads were collected from the Delaware portion of the Nanticoke watershed: Broad Creek in Laurel, Nanticoke Branch upstream of Seaford, and the Marshyhope at Woodenhawk. The Fisheries Section asks that any possible snakehead catches in any Delaware waters be reported by emailing a photograph and details to edna.stetzar@state.de.us