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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 26

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Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
DOI. FWS. Midwest Region.

Delaware Department of Agriculture. Forest Service.

University of Idaho.
University of Idaho. Extension.
Midwest Invasive Plant Network.
Provides information on how to control many invasive plants common to the Midwestern U.S. Information was collected from both scientific literature and expert opinions and summarized by the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN), in partnership with the Mark Renz lab from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Northeast Iowa Resource Conservation and Development.
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
University of Minnesota.
IPM of Midwest Landscapes is available for educating growers, landscapers, managers, and consumers in the principles of IPM and its application to managing the over 150 common insect species in Midwest landscapes.
University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Weed Management Guides for more species
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) is a regional data aggregation effort to develop and provide an early detection and rapid response (EDRR) resource for invasive species in the Midwest region of the United States.
Iowa State University. Extension and Outreach.

University of Idaho Extension.

Special Note: Formerly part of the Idaho OnePlan project, which was terminated in September 2018.

North Central Soybean Research Program. Soybean Research and Information Initiative.

Scroll and select Distribution to view known distribution of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, in counties in the United States and Canada in selected years from 1957 to 2014.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20. MB)