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Invasive Species Resources

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DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Fisheries Management.
DOI. FWS. Midwest Region.
Environmental Law Institute.
A report by attorney Read D. Porter that examines coordination on aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention among the Chesapeake Bay states. The report focuses on prevention-related legal authorities in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania in particular, and recommends actions to improve regional cooperation both within the existing regulatory frameworks and through potential amendments to state laws and regulations to enhance prevention.
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Environmental Law Institute.
Making a List: Prevention Strategies for Invasive Plants in the Great Lakes States surveys plant listing programs in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin to assess the effectiveness of listing as a tool to prevent the proliferation and spreads of invasive plant species.
New Prevention Topics

USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Watercraft Inspection and Decontamination Programs - Many Western states instituted watercraft inspection and decontamination programs after the discovery of invasive mussels in Lake Mead in 2007. This section provides resources on mandated watercraft inspection and decontamination programs, as well as some non-mandated but state-funded watercraft inspection efforts.

Aquatic Invasive Species Decals - Some U.S. states require that boaters purchase an aquatic invasive species decal (sometimes called a stamp, sticker, or permit) before operating watercraft in that state. Many of these regulations were instituted as a response to the spread of zebra and quagga mussels into the Western U.S. Fees from the purchase of these decals are typically used to fund local aquatic invasive species outreach and prevention activities.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
Idaho's inspection stations are placed on major highways at or near the Idaho state line. The purpose of these stations is to inspect watercraft coming from outside of Idaho. Inspectors will look for high-risk boats that have been in quagga mussel and zebra mussel impacted states. Boats will be inspected for any attached mussels and/or standing water and owners also will be asked where they have boated in the previous 30 days. It is important that boaters arrive in Idaho with a clean, drained and dry watercraft.