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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Aquatic Invaders in the Marketplace.

Find non-invasive plant alternatives that may be appropriate in your region.

Aquatic Invaders in the Marketplace.

Predicting the next invasive species allows us to take action before they reach our waterways—an economically and environmentally smarter approach than responding after they’ve arrived. To get a jump on potential invaders, scientists have developed methods that pinpoint the risk a species poses to specific environments based on factors like history of invasion, its ability to survive in similar habitats, and how difficult it is to control. Using these tools and the information they provide, natural resource managers, environmental educators, and individuals who buy and sell live aquatic organisms can make more informed decisions on how to protect their waterways from potential AIM.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee; Flickr.

Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee announced the release of its 2021 Asian Carp Action Plan, a comprehensive portfolio of projects focused on Great Lakes protection.

Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network.

MIPN synthesized recent research on garlic mustard and developed recommendations to help managers navigate sometimes-conflicting information about whether and how to prioritize management of this species. This 12 page guide includes a decision-support tree and a box discussion of best practices for volunteer pull events.

University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
These plants are known to be invasive or potentially invasive in Connecticut and are on Connecticut's list of Invasive and Potentially Invasive Plants. They are known to be present only in relatively low numbers at limited locations in Connecticut. These species should be considered for control and eradication efforts in the state when resources are available. If you find these species: Report your findings immediately to the CT Invasive Plant Coordinator at reportinvasives@uconn.edu.

Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network.

Provides information on how to control many invasive plants common to the Midwestern U.S. Information was collected from both scientific literature and expert opinions and summarized by the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN), in partnership with the Mark Renz lab from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
This guide is intended to assist with identification of invasive plants and provide information on controlling these problem plants. Included are both non-chemical means of control as well as information on proper use of herbicides where chemical controls are needed. The choice of control measure depends on the size and nature of the infestation. If dealt with early enough, invasive plant problems can often be eliminated by non-chemical methods. However, a herbicide-based approach may be required to control an infestation that has become well established or widespread.

Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) is a regional data aggregation effort to develop and provide an early detection and rapid response (EDRR) resource for invasive species in the Midwest region of the United States.

Ohio State University Extension; Purdue University Extension; University of Illinois Extension.

The Weed Control Guide, a joint publication from the Cooperative Extension Services in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, explains the importance of weed control and gives suggestions on herbicide management strategies for corn, popcorn, sweet corn, soybeans, small grains, and forages.

Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.