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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee; Flickr.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.

Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) today announced the United States Department of Agriculture's National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has confirmed that an exotic tick, known as the Asian longhorned tick, has been found in Gallia County. "Due to the nature of this pest, the female ticks can reproduce without a male, so it only takes one tick to create an established population in a new location," said ODA State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey. "This pest is especially fatal to livestock, so producers should practice preventative measures and be on the lookout for this new threat."

The Asian longhorned tick is an exotic East Asian tick that is known as a serious pest to livestock. U.S. Department of Agriculture first confirmed the presence of this tick in the U.S. in New Jersey in 2017. In the United States, the tick has been found in or near counties with large horse, cattle, and sheep populations. To protect against infestations, farmers should check their livestock for ticks regularly. If producers spot unusual looking ticks or large infestations, report this to your local veterinarian or ODA's Division of Animal Health at 614-728-6220.

Ohio State University. College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Plant Disease Information Office.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) in cooperation with USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) announce the detection of single live adult spotted lanternfly, Lycoma delicatula, in Southbury, CT. While no other spotted lanternflies were found upon surveying the immediate area, a live insect strongly suggests others may be present within easy transport from somewhere in the region. Additional surveys in the area are planned.

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper that was discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. It is native to China, India, and Vietnam. It attacks many hosts and has the potential to severely impact Connecticut’s farm crops, particularly apples, grapes, and hops, as well as a number of tree species like maple. Early detection is important for the protection of Connecticut businesses and agriculture. The public is urged to report potential sightings of this invasive pest to ReportSLF@ct.gov. For more information, see the CAES Pest Alert (PDF | 1.9 MB).

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Factsheets for more resources