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Invasive Species Resources

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Pacific Biodiversity Institute (Washington).
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife.
The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program was established by the Oregon Legislature in an effort to keep Oregon’s lakes, rivers and streams free of destructive invasive species. The program requires owners of motorized and some non-motorized boats to purchase an Aquatic Invasive Species Permit to fund inspections of boats coming into Oregon to prevent the spread of these species into our waterways. All vehicles towing or carrying watercraft into Oregon must stop at a watercraft inspection station that is open to inspect for aquatic invasive species.
DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Oregon State University.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Urban Entomology/Pest Management in Arkansas for more factsheets

Portland State University (Oregon).

Oregon State Library. Oregon Documents Repository.
Prepared by: Portland State University, Center for Lakes and Reservoirs
Oregon State Library.
Prepared by: Oregon Invasive Species Council

Oregon Department of Agriculture.

See also: Weed Resources for more risk assessments

Oregon Department of Agriculture.

See also: Weed Resources for more risk assessments
Tennessee Department of Agriculture. Ellington Agricultural Center.
University of Tennessee. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.
Washington Invasive Species Council.
The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states hope the hotline will help them eradicate and curb the spread of feral pigs and provide a better sense of the number of pigs here. See also: Agencies Encourage Reporting of Feral Swine (Nov 21, 2016). The Washington Invasive Species Council, Washington Department of Agriculture, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have issued a news release asking landowners, hikers, hunters, and other recreationists to report feral swine.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Think you've found an invader? Oregon needs your help. Early detection is critical to keep Oregon protected from new invasives. If we can detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we save Oregon's natural resources and prevent costly eradication efforts. By the time an invader is easily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late.

City of Portland (Oregon). Environmental Services.