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Invasive Species Resources

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Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Three Tennessee counties have been quarantined for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) after detection of the forest-devastating insect, bringing the total number of Tennessee counties under a state and federal EAB quarantine to 62. Cheatham, Giles, and Maury counties have been added to the list of areas restricted for the movement of firewood, ash nursery stock, ash timber, and other material that can spread EAB. The tree-killing beetle was recently found in these three counties through the United States Department of Agriculture’s EAB detection program.

Arkansas Agriculture Department. Arkansas Forestry Commission (AFC).

AFC aims to maintain healthy, productive forest ecosystems by preventing, detecting, and suppressing damaging insects and diseases across all land ownerships.

Arkansas Agriculture Department. Arkansas State Plant Board.

Arkansas Agriculture Department.

The mission of the Arkansas State Plant Board is to protect and serve the citizens of Arkansas and the agricultural and business communities by providing information and unbiased enforcement of laws and regulations thus ensuring quality products and services.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Tennessee State Government.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Tennessee State Government.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
The Tennessee Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services, Tennessee Department of Health, and University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) has announced the detection of the invasive Asian longhorned tick in Tennessee. The Asian longhorned tick has now spread to 11 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there is no evidence that the tick has transmitted pathogens to humans or animals in the U.S. Two Asian longhorned ticks were recently found on a dog in Union County, and five were found on a cow in Roane County. In the U.S., the tick has been reported on 17 different mammal species.
Arkansas Agriculture Department. Arkansas State Plant Board.
Tennessee Rules and Regulations.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture. Ellington Agricultural Center.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) poses a serious problem to the health of the black walnut tree. Tennessee Department of Agriculture officials urge area residents and visitors to help prevent the spread of TCD:
  • Don't transport firewood, even within Tennessee.
  • Don't buy or move firewood from outside the state.
  • Watch for signs of infestation in your walnut trees.
If you suspect your walnut tree could be infected with TCD, refer to the TCD Symptoms Checklist to alert state plant and forestry officials, or call TDA's Consumer and Industry Services Division at 1-800-628-2631.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.