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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (United Kingdom). National Amphibian and Reptile Recording Scheme.

North American Invasive Species Management Association.

A new invasive species coalition is celebrating significant milestones in preventing expansion of invasive species after the first anniversary of an important agreement. The North American Invasive Species Management Association, Wildlife Forever, the National Park Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are working to implement on-the-ground strategies to engage the American public and help prevent the spread of invasive species under the new agreement.

Colorado Weed Management Association.
Galapagos Conservancy.
The restoration of Pinzón Island continues following the successful rat eradication campaign in December 2012, carried out by the Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD), in collaboration with Island Conservation and The Raptor Center. In addition to the exciting news of natural recruitment of juvenile tortoises into the population, a potentially new endemic snail species has recently been discovered.

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Fisheries Management.

Island Conservation.

The future is looking a little brighter for seabirds in French Polynesia following the first successful removal of invasive rats in the Marquesas Archipelago. The project, implemented by the Societe d’Ornithologie de Polynesie (Manu), Island Conservation, BirdLife International and Association Vaiku’a i te manu o Ua, will protect a nationally significant population of 90,000 Sooty Terns. Invasive rats present on the island devoured seabird eggs and chicks and native plants. Free from invasive rats, seabirds can once again safely nest and native plants can grow tall and thrive.

ClearSeas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping.

Roatan Marine Park (Honduras).

Reef Environmental Education Foundation.

Lower Platte Weed Management Area.

North America Invasive Species Management Association.

The North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) announces a new addition to its Certified Weed Free Products Program: weed free mulch. Many federal, state, and local lands require the use of certified weed free forage, gravel, or mulch on their properties because invasive plants or noxious weeds cause serious harm to the environment, agriculture, and the economy. Once introduced, weeds can be difficult to control and expensive to manage.

North American Invasive Species Management Association.

NAISMA’s minimum mapping standards for invasive weeds addressed the minimum base information necessary to compare and combine invasive weed maps across tribal, county, state/provincial, national, and even international borders.

Nebraska Weed Control Association.

Public Library of Science.

Note: Collection of all Zika-related research published in PLOS journals; freely accessible

Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

California Academy of Sciences.

Since arriving to the northern Atlantic Ocean less than 30 years ago, lionfish have quickly become one of the most widespread and voracious invasive species, negatively impacting marine ecosystems—particularly coral reefs—from the northeast coast of the United States to the Caribbean Islands. In a new study, an international research team including the California Academy of Sciences presents four new records of lionfish off the coast of Brazil, confirming the invasion of the predatory fish into the South Atlantic for the first time.

Bat Conservation Trust (United Kingdom).