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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 20 of 21

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Washington Native Plant Society.

National Audubon Society.

Use Audubon’s native plants database and explore the best plants for birds in your area (by zip code). Audubon's native plants database draws its plant data from the North American Plant Atlas of the Biota of North America Program (BONAP).

National Conference of State Legislatures.

National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks environment and natural resources legislation to bring you up-to-date, real-time information on bills (from 2015) that have been introduced in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Database provides search options by state (or territory), topic, keyword, year, status or primary sponsor. Topics include: Wildlife-Invasive Species and Wildlife-Pollinators.
Fremont County Weed and Pest Control (Wyoming).
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission.

Jackson Hole Weed Management Association (Wyoming).

New Hampshire Lakes Association.
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
Provides lists of sites for governmental members (U.S. state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies), North American members, affiliate members, and contributing members.

North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA).

The NAISMA Weed Free Products program is the only program in North America that maintains a list of standards that provide land managers assurance that noxious weeds will not be spread through the movement of forage, hay, mulch, or gravel brought in to the property.

National Wildlife Federation.

This tool is designed to help you find the best native plant species to attract the butterflies and birds in your area (by zip code).
See also: General information about Native Plants

North American Native Plant Society.

Local Native Plant Societies are often your best source of information about plants native to your area.
Note: Provides information for State and Canadian Provinces.

Oregon State University. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC).

Through its county agents, the Cooperative Extension Service gives individuals access to the resources at land-grant universities across the nation. These universities are centers for research in many subjects, including entomology (the study of insects) and agriculture. Each county within the United States has an Extension office, which is staffed with agents who work closely with university-based Extension specialists to deliver answers to your questions about gardening, agriculture, and pest control.

Oregon State University. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC).

Whether your pest is a weed, insect, animal, microbe, or another organism, correct identification of your pest makes controlling it easier and often more effective.

Oregon State University. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC).

PlantNative.

PlantNative is dedicated to moving native plants and naturescaping into mainstream landscaping practices. We believe this promotes biodiversity, preserves our natural heritage, reduces pollution and enhances livability. Their goal is to work with nursery owners, landscape professionals and consumers to increase public awareness of native plants and related landscaping practices and to increase both the supply of and demand for native plants.

National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA).

The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture is comprised of the departments of agriculture in all fifty states and the territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. NASDA Members are coregulators with the federal government on a host of responsibilities including animal health, farmland protection, food safety, grain regulation, pesticide registration, and more.

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
State wildlife action plans outline the steps that are needed to conserve wildlife and habitat before they become more rare and more costly to protect. Taken as a whole, they present a national action agenda for preventing wildlife from becoming endangered.
See also: A national look at Species of Greatest Conservation Need as reported in State Wildlife Action Plans (DOI, USGS)
Environmental Law Institute.
This report reviews developments in state laws and regulations governing invasive species in eleven states. It finds that invasive species laws and regulations are often fragmented and incomplete and have developed primarily on a species-by-species basis in response to crisis. As a result, they often fail to address potential future invaders or close off known invasion pathways. Fortunately, states have begun regulating invasion pathways and identifying species that may become invasive in the future due to climate change or other factors. States are increasingly creating interagency councils and management plans to coordinate these novel invasive species responses.
Nature Conservancy.
The Nature Conservancy works across state borders to preserve natural areas throughout the United States. And, the Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.

Idaho Public Television.