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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Based on years of experience and the latest science, APHIS developed a list of 59 pests and diseases that could pose a significant risk to U.S. food and agriculture resources. The list is not meant to be all-encompassing, but rather focus on the most impactful pests and diseases. USDA's goal remains to keep the U.S. free of these foreign pests and diseases.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Located across approximately 39 states, feral hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion annually in agricultural and ecological damage. The Arkansas Feral Hog Eradication Task Force is a group of agencies dedicated to eradicating feral hogs from the state. Accurately measuring the Arkansas feral hog population is part of that process. Sightings can be reported at the Arkansas Feral Hog Sighting Report Form.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS), provides a more accurate picture of the distribution of invasive species. EDDMapS will allow land managers, agencies, and others to set priorities for early detection and rapid response (EDRR), as well as formulate overall invasive plant management action plans. EDDMapS provides online tools for citizens to report invasive species sightings and maps these sightings to provide distribution information by species, state, and county.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
EDDMapS West provides a means of reporting new sightings of select invasive species in Missouri River Watershed Coalition States, a mechanism for alerting appropriate individuals to the reports, and generates distribution maps for the reported species. Available through the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

First Detector, a program of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), equips a nationwide network of individuals to rapidly detect and report the presence of invasive, exotic plant pathogens, arthropods, nematodes, and weeds. If you suspect the presence of a high-impact plant pest or pathogen, contact a diagnostician and submit a sample for diagnosis.

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.

FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

Mississippi State University. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station.
The primary goal of this service is to provide Mississippi citizens with identification and management recommendations for insect pests that affect their homes, their gardens, or the crops they are trying to produce. The lab also works closely with the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and observant Mississippi citizens to help facilitate early detection of new invasive insect pests that appear in the state.

Mississippi Department of Marine Resources.

Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Maine Forest Service. Winter moth was first recorded in Nova Scotia in the 1930s and then in the Pacific Northwest in the 1970's. It showed up in eastern Massachusetts in the early 2000's and has since spread into coastal Maine from Kittery to Bar Harbor. Fill out the Winter Moth Survey to help us gather information about the distribution of these moths across Maine. The results will be used to help with biological control development and other research.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry has announced a formal quarantine on emerald ash borer (EAB) and material that may harbor it. Quarantine Area: The quarantine area includes all of York County, all of Cumberland County, parts of Oxford County, and the northeastern corner of Aroostook County. The quarantine boundaries were drawn to include a buffer on those towns where EAB had been detected. EAB was found in northern Aroostook County in May 2018, western York County in September 2018, and Cumberland County in September 2019. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

NPDN is a national network of diagnostic laboratories that rapidly and accurately detect and report pathogens that cause plant diseases of national interest, particularly those that could be deemed to be a biosecurity risk. The specific purpose of the NPDN is to provide a cohesive, distributed system to quickly detect and identify pests and pathogens of concern.

Oregon State University. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC).

Whether your pest is a weed, insect, animal, microbe, or another organism, correct identification of your pest makes controlling it easier and often more effective.