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Invasive Species Resources

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Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Located across approximately 39 states, feral hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion annually in agricultural and ecological damage. The Arkansas Feral Hog Eradication Task Force is a group of agencies dedicated to eradicating feral hogs from the state. Accurately measuring the Arkansas feral hog population is part of that process. Sightings can be reported at the Arkansas Feral Hog Sighting Report Form.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

DHS. Customs and Border Protection.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists have already intercepted a dozen significant and potentially destructive pests this year at various ports of entry in Florida as part of the agency's all-encompassing efforts to safeguard American agriculture.

Unknown pests pose a significant risk in agriculture due to a lack of knowledge in controlling the pests and the extent of damage they can cause to crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologists recently classified eight pests discovered by CBP agriculture specialists in Florida as first-in-the-nation interceptions and another pest as a new species.

DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

University of Florida. IFAS Extension. Integrated Pest Management.

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.
Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source Publication #VM65

Vermont Invasives.

An emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle was detected in a tree located in Londonderry, VT. The mapped area in Vermont (PDF | 1.25 MB) to which "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations apply now covers:

  • All of Londonderry, Windham, and Landgrove;
  • Most of Jamaica, Winhall, Peru, Weston, Andover and Grafton; and
  • Extends into Chester, Townshend, Stratton, Athens, Mount Tabor, and Wardsboro.

October means that non-flight season Recommendations to Slow the Spread of Emerald Ash Borer are now in effect when moving ash from the infested area. With the heating season underway, and firewood deliveries actively occurring, it’s important to remember that untreated ash firewood should never move out of infested areas. Be sure that your purchase or transportation of both log length and split firewood will not unnecessarily spread EAB. There’s a lot of spread to slow: While the infested area map shows that high-risk areas for EAB include many towns, visibly infested trees still remain rare in Vermont. You can help by following the "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations.

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.
FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Urban Entomology/Pest Management in Arkansas for more factsheets

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council.

See also: Publications - Flyers for more climbing fern resources

South Florida Water Management District.

Several local and federal agencies today took another step in protecting America's Everglades by releasing an insect reared to combat the invasive Brazilian peppertree. The insects, known as thrips, were reared as part of a joint partnership between the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the National Park Service, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) to combat invasive plants in South Florida's ecosystem.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry.

University of Florida. IFAS. Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants.
Comprehensive site why and how aquatic plants are managed in Florida waters. These five sections (why manage plants; overview of Florida waters, control methods, developing management plans, and research and outreach) will guide you through the many factors considered by Fish and Wildlife Conservation commission (FWC) biologists when developing aquatic plant management plans for Florida waters. Our priority is to manage invasive plants while also conserving and enhancing our unique aquatic habitats and wildlife communities.