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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.

Colorado Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). EAB is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest. Help protect Colorado's ash trees! Don't move firewood, and consider chemical treatments to protect high-value ash trees.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

The emerald ash borer is a half-inch long metallic green beetle with the scientific name Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larvae of this beetle feed under the bark of ash trees. Their feeding eventually girdles and kills branches and entire trees. Emerald ash borer was first identified in North America in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk; Charles Darwin Foundation; Galapagos National Park; Ecuadorian Agricultural Health Service in Galapagos; Galapagos National Institute.
Governor's Invasive Species Council of Pennsylvania.
Instituto Hórus de Desenvolvimento e Conservação Ambiental (Horus Institute of Environmental Development and Conservation, Brazil).
Special Note: Site in Portuguese and Spanish

University of Alaska - Fairbanks. Cooperative Extension Service.

Mississippi State University. Extension Service.

Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.

Reef Environmental Education Foundation.

Universidad de Concepción (Chile).

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
On Aug. 9, 2011, the department in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Penn State Cooperative Extension confirmed the presence of Thousand Cankers Disease in black walnut trees in Bucks County. Since this pest complex cannot be eradicated in Pennsylvania, and since black walnut is of high value to the forest products industry and to forest and urban ecologies, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture is joining with state and federal agencies and Penn State Cooperative Extension to slow the spread of TCD in the state through monitoring and quarantine. For more information or to report a possible case of Thousand Cankers Disease on walnut please contact your Pennsylvania local county cooperative extension office or contact the Invasive Species Hotline at 1-866-253-7189 or Badbug@pa.gov.
Colorado State University. Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management.
Mississippi State University. Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts.
Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Provides facts about bird flu and wild birds, answers to common questions and links to more detailed information

Pan American Health Organization; Regional Office for The Americas of the World Health Organization.