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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. Division of Environmental Health. State Veterinarian.

In 2019, the Alaska Office of the State Veterinarian, in collaboration with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the University of Alaska, began the Alaska Submit-A-Tick Program. Through this program, individuals who find ticks on themselves, their family members, pets, or wildlife (e.g. hunted or trapped animals) can submit ticks for species identification and pathogen testing. Researchers are asking Alaskans to submit ticks to help determine which tick species are currently in the state. Tick submissions will also help us learn more about how ticks are being imported into Alaska so that we can create effective strategies to limit their introduction. Ticks can transmit bacteria, parasites, and viruses that can cause diseases in humans and wildlife. Pathogen testing allows us to assess tickborne disease risk in the state.

Arizona Department of Agriculture.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

In May 2010 the last boll weevil was trapped in the state and in March 2012 the boll weevil was declared eradicated from the state of Louisiana. The Eradication Program is now at a maintenance level, funded through grower maintenance inspection fees. Traps are placed and monitored according to an approved trapping protocol. Cotton producers have seen increases in yields along with a reduction in the cost of insect control.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

South Carolina Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer, a beetle pest that has devastated ash trees throughout the eastern United States, was officially detected in Greenville, Oconee and Spartanburg counties in August 2017. According to a Clemson University press release, the beetles were found Aug. 3 during a routine check of Emerald Ash Borer traps and confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In response to the discovery of EAB in the Upstate, the State Crop Pest Commission likely will establish a quarantine area involving at least the three affected counties; it is also possible the quarantine could be expanded to additional counties or even the entire state.

Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Your vigilance could help us intercept and prevent the spread of an unwanted biological invader – an invasive species that shouldn’t be here and which could cause serious harm to Alaska’s native fish and wildlife species, and their habitats.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Aquatic Nuisance Species Program.
Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

A cornerstone product of the Washington Invasive Species Council is a strategic plan designed to build upon local, state, and regional efforts, while serving as a forum for invasive species education and communication. The Washington Invasive Species Council Strategic Plan provides priorities, and direction and formalizes the council’s commitment to invasive species control and prevention.

The council is seeking input from partners and the public on a strategy for 2020-2025, which builds upon the 2008 strategy and 2015 strategy and clarifies council recommendations and proposed actions. All are invited to review the draft 2020 strategy, and comment by e-mailing InvasiveSpecies@rco.wa.gov before December 10, 2020.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington).

King County's Best Management Practices (BMP's) help landowners control weeds using a variety of options that consider characteristics of the site and keep negative side effects to a minimum. The Noxious Weed Control Program follows county guidelines of Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The goal is to maximize effective control and to minimize environmental, economic and social damage.

Washington Department of Agriculture.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Asian giant hornet is the world's largest species of hornet. In December 2019, WSDA received and verified four reports of Asian giant hornet near Blaine and Bellingham. These are the first-ever sighting in the U.S. Canada had also discovered Asian giant hornet in two locations in British Columbia in the fall of 2019. If it becomes established, this hornet will have serious negative impacts on the environment, economy, and public health of Washington State. If you think you may have spotted an Asian giant hornet, report it using the Hornet Watch Report Form.
See also: Learn more about Asian giant hornets and WSDA’s program to eradicate them.

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

To help combat the $1.3 billion threat invasive species pose to Washington's economy every year, the Washington Invasive Species Council is inviting the public to the frontlines of its work by detecting invasive species and reporting them on its newly improved WA Invasives app. The free app enables anyone to report a plant or animal by collecting photographs, geographic coordinates, and sighting information. Users recreating in the backcountry also can collect data offline, when cellular service isn't available. The app also acts as digital field guide.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Aquatic Nuisance Species Program.
The S.C. Department of Natural Resources in conjunction with the Aquatic Plant Management Council is responsible for the management of nuisance aquatic vegetation in public waters. Each year an Aquatic Plant Management Plan is developed which identifies aquatic weed problem areas, describes management objectives, prescribes management strategies, and determines funding needs and sources.