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Invasive Species Resources

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New Mexico State University. Library Digital Collections.
Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”
Purdue University. Botany and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.

U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) officials have confirmed the first detection of sweet orange scab (SOS) in Alabama. The fruit sample was collected in Baldwin County by Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries' (ADAI) plant protection inspectors during a delimiting survey for citrus greening disease. The Auburn University Plant Diagnostic Clinic provided the initial diagnosis of SOS, and USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) program lab personnel confirmed the diagnosis. SOS is a plant disease caused by the fungus Elsinöe australis and does not pose a threat to human or animal health. The disease is appropriately named as it results in scab-like lesions on fruit rinds and, less often, on leaves and twigs of sweet oranges, limes, lemons, mandarins, satsumas, kumquats, grapefruit, tangerines and tangerine hybrids. This is the first confirmed case of SOS in Alabama despite annual surveillance for citrus pathogens by ADAI plant protection inspectors.

Purdue University Extension. Weed Science.
City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).
Purdue University (Indiana). Extension.

New Mexico Department of Transportation.

Vegetation control is necessary to slow and/or prevent the spread of noxious weeds. Federal and State Executive orders require the Department to take steps to prevent the spread of invasive or noxious plants.
New Mexico State University.