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Invasive Species Resources

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Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Virginia Administrative Code.
Virginia Administrative Code.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) established a Spotted Lanternfly Quarantine for Frederick County and the city of Winchester, effective immediately. The purpose of the quarantine is to slow the spread of the spotted lanternfly to uninfested areas of the Commonwealth. Early detection is vital for the management of any newly introduced plant pest. For more information on Spotted Lanternfly in Virginia, see: Plant Industry Services (scroll to SLF section).

The spotted lanternfly was first detected in Winchester in January 2018. Subsequent surveys conducted by VDACS indicate that the pest has become established in the city of Winchester and spread into Frederick County, just north of Winchester. Prior to the January 2018 detection in Virginia, the only Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) found in the U.S. was in Pennsylvania. Populations are now established in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and northern Virginia.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.

Report a suspect Spotted Lanternfly. Enables Extension professional to collect information.

Arlington Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources (Virginia).

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. Division of Natural Heritage.
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Virginia Tech.

Virginia Tech researchers who helped identify the dangerous Giant Hogweed plants in Clarke County, Virginia, want residents to stay on the lookout for the plant with toxic sap that can cause severe burns — but also stressed that the weeds are believed to have been planted intentionally decades ago and haven’t spread in the years since. Anyone who suspects they have found Giant Hogweed should take photos, check online to compare the plant to giant hogweed photos, and then contact a Virginia Cooperative Extension agent.

Piedmont Environmental Council.
Wavyleaf basketgrass is a new exotic grass rapidly moving into forests and meadows in Virginia and Maryland. The Piedmont Environmental Council is part of a Task Force committed to stopping this plant before it forms a thick carpet on our forest floors, crowding out native plants. If you think you spot wavyleaf basketgrass, please report your sighting.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.