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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 12 of 12

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University of Florida.
La Plata National University (Argentina). Invading Mollusks Research Group.
University of the United States Virgin Islands. Cooperative Extension Service.
Universidad de Concepción (Chile).
Special Note: In Spanish
Marine Education Society of Australasia.
University of Texas - Austin. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.
Provides lists of native plants recommended for various purposes (by State or Canadian Province). Once you have selected a collection, you can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search. Also provides other special collections resources.

University of New Zealand. Massey University.

Brock University (Canada).

The Niagara Region’s Aquatic and Riparian Invasive Species Control Database (created by Lyn A. Brown as part of a Master of Sustainability thesis at Brock University) provides a baseline for the 2017/18 state of aquatic and riparian invasive management activities in the Niagara Region of Ontario. An interactive GIS map uses the database information to show where those control efforts are occurring, and users can filter points on the map by invasive species, control type, control effectiveness, or organization.

Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food, and Environment.
Virginia Tech.
North American beavers have wiped out 30 percent of forests along rivers and streams in Tierra del Fuego, a remote archipelago at the southern tip of South America, causing the greatest landscape change to these fragile forests in the last 10,000 years. It’s no surprise, then, that the governments of Chile and Argentina want the invasive beavers gone. But eradicating them has proven to be difficult, researchers found, because it requires the participation of every single landowner in the area.
Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agrícolas. Mexico.
Special Note: In Spanish