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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Instituto Brasileiro de Biodiversidade (Brazil).

Bioinvasão Brasil is a digital platform developed with the objective of making available records of invasive alien species in Brazil. Special Note: In Portuguese.

Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network (IABIN). I3N Invasive Species Network. Horus Institute for Environmental Conservation and Development.
International Potato Center.
Galapagos Conservancy.
The restoration of Pinzón Island continues following the successful rat eradication campaign in December 2012, carried out by the Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD), in collaboration with Island Conservation and The Raptor Center. In addition to the exciting news of natural recruitment of juvenile tortoises into the population, a potentially new endemic snail species has recently been discovered.
La Plata National University (Argentina). Invading Mollusks Research Group.
CropLife Latin America.

NeoBiota 67: 485-510.

Invasive species can have severe impacts on ecosystems, economies, and human health. Though the economic impacts of invasions provide important foundations for management and policy, up-to-date syntheses of these impacts are lacking. To produce the most comprehensive estimate of invasive species costs within North America (including the Greater Antilles) to date, we synthesized economic impact data from the recently published InvaCost database (see related research article: InvaCost, a public database of the economic costs of biological invasions worldwide (Sep 8, 2020).
See also: This article is part of NeoBiota 67: The economic costs of biological invasions around the world.

Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk; Charles Darwin Foundation; Galapagos National Park; Ecuadorian Agricultural Health Service in Galapagos; Galapagos National Institute.
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.
More than 50 non-native species have found their way to the Galápagos Islands, over 10 times more than scientists previously thought, reports a new study in Aquatic Invasions published Thursday, March 28. The study, a joint effort of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Williams College, and the Charles Darwin Foundation, documents 53 species of introduced marine animals in this UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of the largest marine protected areas on Earth. Before this study came out, scientists knew about only five.

Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (Institute for Marine and Coastal Research, Colombia).

Special Note: In Spanish

Instituto Hórus de Desenvolvimento e Conservação Ambiental (Horus Institute of Environmental Development and Conservation, Brazil).
Special Note: Site in Portuguese and Spanish

CAB International.

The Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD) is partnering with CABI and the Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF) to help protect the iconic Galapagos Islands from an invasive blackberry (Rubus niveus). This non-native plant was introduced in 1968 and is causing serious problems for local biodiversity and agriculture. It is now considered one of the worst weeds affecting the islands.

Reef Environmental Education Foundation.

Universidad de Concepción (Chile).

Scientific American.
In 1946 the Argentine Navy imported 10 beaver couples from Canada and set them free in Isla Grande, the deep south of Tierra del Fuego, with the intention of "enriching" the native fauna—and the local fur industry. The consequences of such initiative were disastrous: Protected from hunting for 35 years, and devoid of natural predators, the beavers grew over 5,000 times their initial population, caused irreversible changes in the forest ecosystem, and started advancing over the continent. Now, a study published in Chilean Natural History suggests that the demographic explosion of those beavers could be bigger than suspected because it can take years or even decades for local inhabitants to notice the rodents' presence and their impact on the surrounding ecosystems.

Virginia Tech.

North American beavers have wiped out 30 percent of forests along rivers and streams in Tierra del Fuego, a remote archipelago at the southern tip of South America, causing the greatest landscape change to these fragile forests in the last 10,000 years. It’s no surprise, then, that the governments of Chile and Argentina want the invasive beavers gone. But eradicating them has proven to be difficult, researchers found, because it requires the participation of every single landowner in the area.

California Academy of Sciences.

Since arriving to the northern Atlantic Ocean less than 30 years ago, lionfish have quickly become one of the most widespread and voracious invasive species, negatively impacting marine ecosystems—particularly coral reefs—from the northeast coast of the United States to the Caribbean Islands. In a new study, an international research team including the California Academy of Sciences presents four new records of lionfish off the coast of Brazil, confirming the invasion of the predatory fish into the South Atlantic for the first time.

Pan American Health Organization; Regional Office for The Americas of the World Health Organization.