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Invasive Species Resources

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Alberta Invasive Species Council (Canada).
See also: Fact Sheets for more information about individual invasive species, including those listed as "Prohibited Noxious" and "Noxious" under the Alberta Weed Control Act
Alberta Invasive Species Council (Canada).
See also: Fact Sheets for more information about individual invasive species, including those listed as "Prohibited Noxious" and "Noxious" under the Alberta Weed Control Act
Alberta Invasive Species Council (Canada).
See also: Fact Sheets for more information about individual invasive species, including those listed as "Prohibited Noxious" and "Noxious" under the Alberta Weed Control Act
Alberta Invasive Species Council (Canada).
See also: Fact Sheets for more information about individual invasive species, including those listed as "Prohibited Noxious" and "Noxious" under the Alberta Weed Control Act
UN. World Health Organization.
UN. Food and Agriculture Organization.
The ongoing spread of wheat rusts, a group of fungal plant diseases that stymy the production of the staple grain and other crops, is raising concern in Central Asia and the Middle East and sparking closer international collaboration to study, detect and prevent the threat from advancing further.
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Food and Fertilizer Technology Center.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has confirmed the presence of Whirling Disease in fish in Johnson Lake in Banff National Park. This is the first case of whirling disease in Canada. The federal and provincial governments will work together to develop an appropriate response plan as additional information about the disease situation is confirmed.
Island Conservation.
The future is looking a little brighter for seabirds in French Polynesia following the first successful removal of invasive rats in the Marquesas Archipelago. The project, implemented by the Societe d’Ornithologie de Polynesie (Manu), Island Conservation, BirdLife International and Association Vaiku’a i te manu o Ua, will protect a nationally significant population of 90,000 Sooty Terns. Invasive rats present on the island devoured seabird eggs and chicks and native plants. Free from invasive rats, seabirds can once again safely nest and native plants can grow tall and thrive.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.