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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Common Disease Problems for more fact sheets.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Field Crop Diseases in Arkansas for more factsheets
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Hobby and Small Flock Poultry in Arkansas for more factsheets
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Extension Publications for more resources
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.
DOI. NPS. Buffalo National River.
On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed the presence of the Longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in Arkansas. The Longhorned tick is an exotic East Asian tick associated with bacterial and viral tickborne diseases of animals and humans in other parts of the world. This tick is considered by USDA to be a serious threat to livestock because heavy tick infestations may cause stunted growth, decreased production and animal deaths. Like deer-ticks, the nymphs of the Longhorned tick are very small (resembling tiny spiders) and can easily go unnoticed on animals and people. This tick is known to infest a wide range of species and has the potential to infect multiple North American wildlife species, humans, dogs, cats, and livestock.
DOI. Office of Insular Affairs.
Doug Domenech, U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Insular and International Affairs this week announced $1,488,890 in fiscal year 2018 grants to combat invasive species and protect natural resources in the U.S. Territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as the freely associated states of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau. "Invasive species in the islands are disruptive for both marine and terrestrial resources in the islands, which already face a delicate balance," said Assistant Secretary Domenech. "Secretary Zinke and I are pleased to help control and eradicate invasive species in the islands in order to protect public health, livelihoods, and fragile environments and economies."
United States Department of the Interior.
Interior Acting Assistant Secretary for Insular Areas Nikolao Pula made available $409,885 to preserve natural and cultural resources and protect against invasive species on Guam. “We are especially pleased that Congress was able to provide some extra funding in FY 2017 to mitigate and control the coconut rhinoceros beetle and little fire ant on Guam,” said Pula. “All funding supports Governor Eddie Calvo’s efforts in protecting Guam’s natural resources now and for the future.”
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Forest Invasive Pests for more resources
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Arkansas Invasive Pests for more factsheets
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Arkansas Invasive Pests for more factsheets
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Arkansas Forage Management Guides for more factsheets
DOI. National Park Service.
The National Park Service (NPS) has finalized a long-term strategy to reduce the impacts and threats from invasive plants and to restore native plant communities and historic landscapes for 15 national park areas in D.C., Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. The Invasive Plant Management Plan will guide park staff in standardizing and streamlining their treatment of non-native invasive plants. The plan will also help the NPS identify areas with the most urgent needs in order to address the most immediate threats to park resources. Each of the 15 area parks will develop an annual non-native invasive plant treatment strategy that is based on science, is cost effective, and poses the least amount of risk to people and park resources.
University of the District of Columbia. College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability, and Environmental Sciences.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Common Disease Problems for more fact sheets
West Virginia Department of Agriculture.
The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) opened an email hotline for the early detection of invasive pests. West Virginia citizens can send a picture of a suspected pest, a brief description of visible damage to buildings or plants and their location (nearest town) to bugbusters@wvda.us. Landowners will be notified if the tip raises concerns, and a site visit may be scheduled. See WVDA News Releases for more news.