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Invasive Species Resources

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Arizona Game and Fish Department.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for additional risk analyses and related species information

University of Arizona; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Arizona Department of Agriculture.

This list of the most serious biotic pests and pathogens is maintained by the State (Arizona Department of Agriculture) and Federal (USDA) regulatory agents. Their goal is to prevent the introduction and/or spread of these pests/pathogens in our state.

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.
DOI. Office of Insular Affairs.
Doug Domenech, U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Insular and International Affairs this week announced $1,488,890 in fiscal year 2018 grants to combat invasive species and protect natural resources in the U.S. Territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as the freely associated states of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau. "Invasive species in the islands are disruptive for both marine and terrestrial resources in the islands, which already face a delicate balance," said Assistant Secretary Domenech. "Secretary Zinke and I are pleased to help control and eradicate invasive species in the islands in order to protect public health, livelihoods, and fragile environments and economies."
United States Department of the Interior.
Interior Acting Assistant Secretary for Insular Areas Nikolao Pula made available $409,885 to preserve natural and cultural resources and protect against invasive species on Guam. “We are especially pleased that Congress was able to provide some extra funding in FY 2017 to mitigate and control the coconut rhinoceros beetle and little fire ant on Guam,” said Pula. “All funding supports Governor Eddie Calvo’s efforts in protecting Guam’s natural resources now and for the future.”
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.
The Invaders Program was initiated in 2005 to tackle the rise of biological invasions by harmful exotic species of plants and animals, with an emphasis on seven species of interest. Since then, the program has expanded to include a broad number of invasive species within the Sonoran Desert, hands-on research, and education to community members. Our goals are to identify the impacts of invasives in our region, map the spread of these invasives, collaborate with eradication projects, and educate others about the resulting implications to the Sonoran Desert.
DOI. National Park Service.
The National Park Service (NPS) has finalized a long-term strategy to reduce the impacts and threats from invasive plants and to restore native plant communities and historic landscapes for 15 national park areas in D.C., Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. The Invasive Plant Management Plan will guide park staff in standardizing and streamlining their treatment of non-native invasive plants. The plan will also help the NPS identify areas with the most urgent needs in order to address the most immediate threats to park resources. Each of the 15 area parks will develop an annual non-native invasive plant treatment strategy that is based on science, is cost effective, and poses the least amount of risk to people and park resources.
University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
This booklet is the 2nd edition of a similar booklet published in 2001. This edition includes most of the invasive plant species that appeared in the 1st edition and several other species have been added. The booklet is not intended to provide a comprehensive list of all of Arizona’s invasive weeds, but rather, it illustrates a few invasive plants that have become, or have the potential to become, problematic in Arizona.
Publication Number: AZ1482-2016
University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Cotton Insect Publications for more factsheets
University of the District of Columbia. College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability, and Environmental Sciences.
Arizona State University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
See also: Citrus Insect Pests for more factsheets
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of pet chickens in Coconino County, Arizona. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Arizona. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as tests show the virus is almost identical to the virus causing disease in California. Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products. In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian or to State veterinary officials. Additional information on biosecurity for all poultry flocks can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock.
West Virginia Department of Agriculture.
The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) opened an email hotline for the early detection of invasive pests. West Virginia citizens can send a picture of a suspected pest, a brief description of visible damage to buildings or plants and their location (nearest town) to bugbusters@wvda.us. Landowners will be notified if the tip raises concerns, and a site visit may be scheduled. See WVDA News Releases for more news.