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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Nebraska - Lincoln.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
North Dakota State University. Extension Service.
United States Department of the Interior.
Interior Acting Assistant Secretary for Insular Areas Nikolao Pula made available $409,885 to preserve natural and cultural resources and protect against invasive species on Guam. “We are especially pleased that Congress was able to provide some extra funding in FY 2017 to mitigate and control the coconut rhinoceros beetle and little fire ant on Guam,” said Pula. “All funding supports Governor Eddie Calvo’s efforts in protecting Guam’s natural resources now and for the future.”
Nebraska Forest Service.
The Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) has confirmed that emerald ash borer (EAB) was discovered during a site inspection in Omaha's Pulaski Park on June 6, 2016. Nebraska becomes the 27th state to confirm the presence of EAB, joining neighboring states of Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. NDA has issued a quarantine prohibiting ash nursery stock from leaving the quarantine area. The quarantine also regulates the movement of hardwood firewood and mulch, ash timber products and green waste material out of Douglas, Sarpy, Cass, Washington and Dodge counties to assist in the prevention of human-assisted spread of the pest into un-infested areas.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
Note: Economics of Damage and Control
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.

West Virginia Department of Agriculture.

The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) has confirmed the presence of a new, invasive insect, the Spotted Lanternfly (Lycormia delicatula), in West Virginia. A small population of Spotted Lanternfly was detected in the Bunker Hill area of Berkeley County on October 30. The United States Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service confirmed the findings. "We have been surveying for this invasive pest for the past two years. We knew it was only a matter of time until the Spotted Lanternfly made it to our state," said Commissioner of Agriculture Kent Leonhardt. "The next step is to ask for formal assistance from our federal and state partners to put together an action plan to combat this pest." For more information or to report potential Spotted Lanternfly sightings, contact bugbusters@wvda.us or 304-788-1066.

West Virginia Department of Agriculture.
The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) opened an email hotline for the early detection of invasive pests. West Virginia citizens can send a picture of a suspected pest, a brief description of visible damage to buildings or plants and their location (nearest town) to bugbusters@wvda.us. Landowners will be notified if the tip raises concerns, and a site visit may be scheduled. See WVDA News Releases for more news.