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Invasive Species Resources

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Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
The Indiana Terrestrial Plant Rule (312 IAC 18-3-25) designates 44 species of plants as invasive pests. This rule makes it illegal to sell, gift, barter, exchange, distribute, transport, or introduce these plants in the State of Indiana. This rule goes into effect in two stages. As of April 18, 2019, it is illegal to introduce plant species on this list not already found in Indiana. Plant species already in trade will be prohibited from sale one year later (April 18, 2020).
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
Anyone who will launch a boat in Idaho waters must buy an Idaho Invasive Species Fund sticker from Idaho Parks and Recreation, The fees generated from the sale of these stickers will fund vessel inspections, washing stations, and informational materials that will help Idaho prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species, such as quagga mussels.
Oklahoma Administrative Code.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Consumer Protection Services.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
Idaho's inspection stations are placed on major highways at or near the Idaho state line. The purpose of these stations is to inspect watercraft coming from outside of Idaho. Inspectors will look for high-risk boats that have been in quagga mussel and zebra mussel impacted states. Boats will be inspected for any attached mussels and/or standing water and owners also will be asked where they have boated in the previous 30 days. It is important that boaters arrive in Idaho with a clean, drained and dry watercraft.