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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program.
The Clean Boats, Clean Waters volunteer watercraft inspection program is an opportunity to take a front line defense against the spread of aquatic invasive species.

University of Guam.

The University of Guam received another round of funding in September under the U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Protection Act for the surveying and monitoring of invasive pests of solanaceous crops that are on USDA’s Priority Pest List for 2021. Solanaceae, or nightshades, are a family of flowering plants that include tomato, eggplant, and chili pepper. As part of the national effort this year, UOG was awarded $38,000 to survey and monitor for two pests: Tuta absoluta, which is a moth and type of leafminer capable of destroying an entire crop, and Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2, which is a bacterium, known as a bacterial wilt, that infects through the roots and is deadly to plants.

The work through UOG better prepares the island to manage these invasive species if or when they arrive. "There are certain pathogens and insects that have a reputation of being really bad. These are two of them," said project lead Robert L. Schlub, a researcher and faculty member of UOG Cooperative Extension and Outreach with a doctorate in plant pathology. "They aren’t on Guam, but if they show up, we want to know so we can help get them under control."

University of Wisconsin.
University of Wisconsin. Extension.
University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
University of Missouri-Columbia.
North Carolina State University. Extension.
University of Minnesota.
IPM of Midwest Landscapes is available for educating growers, landscapers, managers, and consumers in the principles of IPM and its application to managing the over 150 common insect species in Midwest landscapes.
University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.
Oregon State University. Extension Service.
This handbook is intended as a ready reference guide to the control and management tactics for the more important plant diseases in the Pacific Northwest. The specific cultural, biological, and chemical recommendations are intended to manage a specific plant disease but may not always be appropriate under all production circumstances. The synthesis of a specific management recommendation should be done by a qualified individual. For this reason, this book should be used by—and has been expressly written for—county Extension agents, consultants, field and nursery people, and chemical industry representatives. Information in this publication is in a state of constant change.