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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

The Invasive Plant Management Section funds scientific research projects at Florida's universities to improve the state's invasive plant management programs by finding more cost-efficient control techniques and also insuring these control methods are effective, safe, and environmentally compatible.

Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

The cost share grants are available for local projects to prevent the spread of invasive aquatic plants. Grants are available for courtesy boat inspection programs for invasive aquatic species prevention and for lake organizations conducting aquatic control projects.
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has killed more than six million bats over the past decade. WNS is caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). Studies show that bats eat enough insect pests to save the U.S. corn industry more than $1 billion a year in crop damage and pesticide costs, and more than $3 billion per year to all agricultural production including forests.
 

To help fund the research needed to combat this deadly disease, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced $2.5 million in grants for research of high priority questions about WNS that will improve our ability to manage the disease and conserve affected bats.