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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Conference of Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers.

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers have identified the "least wanted" aquatic invasive species (AIS) that present an imminent threat to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region. In 2013, the Governors and Premiers committed to take priority action on the transfer of these species to and within the region. Since then, the states and provinces have taken more than 50 separate actions to restrict these high-risk AIS, and the US federal government has similarly restricted four of the species. See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more resources.

Blue Accounting.
The species watch list identifies species that are likely to have a high or moderate ecological and/or socioeconomic impact if they established in or spread to new locations in the Great Lakes Basin. The watch list was compiled using several regional risk assessment sources and was developed as part of the Aquatic Invasive Species Interstate Surveillance Framework for the U.S. Waters of the Great Lakes.
Miami-Dade County (Florida); DOD. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; DOI. National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; South Florida Water Management District.
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.
FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).
Florida Invasive Species Partnership.
DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

Great Lakes Commission.

The Great Lakes Calendar features events from around the region that may be of interest to Great Lakes stakeholders, with a focus on professional conferences and events relevant to research, science, policy, and education.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

Great Lakes Commission; Invasive Mussel Collaborative.
The Invasive Mussel Collaborative announced today that it has released a new strategy to reduce invasive mussels and their negative impacts. The Strategy to Advance Management of Invasive Zebra and Quagga Mussels is intended to drive investments, policy, and research around invasive mussels across the Great Lakes region and beyond. Since their initial discovery in 1989, zebra and quagga mussels have had dramatic impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, including changes to the food web, degrading fish habitat, interfering with drinking water systems and damaging tourism and recreation economies. Today, these mussels continue to spread to new water bodies across the U.S. and Canada.

Ohio State University. College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Ohio State University Extension has released a new app for spotting and tracking invasive species -- non-native organisms such as Asian carps, purple loosestrife and Asian longhorned beetle -- to try to keep them from setting up beachheads and hurting the economy and environment. By using the free Great Lakes Early Detection Network app, a person can take pictures of suspected invasive species -- whether of farm, forest or water -- and upload the pictures and locations for verification. Based on this early warning, scientists can send out alerts, map the spread and figure out a battle plan.

Great Lakes Commission.

Aquatic invasive species inflict millions of dollars of ecological and economic damage to the Great Lakes, with impacts on coastal industries, water quality, native fish and wildlife and human health. Recently, Blue Accounting, in partnership with state and federal agencies, launched a new suite of web-based resources and tools to support early detection of aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes. The earlier new aquatic invasive species are detected, the easier and less expensive it is to avoid potentially devastating consequences of a large invasion. The new tools released by the Blue Accounting initiative help target efforts to focus on high-risk species and locations across the 11,000 miles of shoreline and 94,000 miles of surface area that make up the Great Lakes basin.

Great Lakes Commission.

South Florida Water Management District.

Several local and federal agencies today took another step in protecting America's Everglades by releasing an insect reared to combat the invasive Brazilian peppertree. The insects, known as thrips, were reared as part of a joint partnership between the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the National Park Service, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) to combat invasive plants in South Florida's ecosystem.

University of Florida. IFAS. TAME Melaleuca.

TAME Melaleuca (collaborative effort between U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service and University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, South Florida Water Management District, and others)
Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area.