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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat.
The Be Plant Wise campaign, launched by Defra and the Scottish Government, is designed to raise awareness among gardeners, pond owners and retailers of the damage caused by invasive aquatic plants and to encourage the public to dispose of these plants correctly. We have developed resources with advice for gardeners and pond owners and are working closely with retailers of aquatic plants to provide information in stores. These pages contain the detailed information you need to Be Plant Wise.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program.
The Clean Boats, Clean Waters volunteer watercraft inspection program is an opportunity to take a front line defense against the spread of aquatic invasive species.
Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.
  • Don't Let it Loose! Be a responsible pet owner.
  • Commit to be PlantWise! Choose non-invasive alternatives for your garden.
  • Clean, Drain, and Dry your boat and equipment.

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

University of Wisconsin.
Washington Sea Grant.
United Kingdom Environment Agency.
Invasive Plants Association of Wisconsin (IPAW).
One of the basic principles of invasive plant management is early detection. To that end, IPAW is sponsoring a reward program to encourage and provide incentive for citizens of the state to look for and report prohibited invasive plants.
Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.
King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Fish & Wildlife Department.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.
River Alliance of Wisconsin.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington Pest Watch is a citizen science initiative led by agencies and universities at the front line in protecting our state’s natural resources and economy from invasive species. You don't have to be an entomologist or biologist to participate in the network; the majority of network members are everyday people who keep their eyes peeled for the signs and symptoms of high priority invasive species and report them to agencies to aid in detections and rapid response. Just keep an eye out in your yard, your neighborhood, or when enjoying outdoor activities. Be aware and report what you spot—it’s simple and easy.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
The Washington State Watercraft Passport is free and available for use by the public. The passport is primarily designed for Washington residents who regularly transport recreational watercraft in and out of the state, but is available to any boater. The passport can help boaters to keep track of the waters they've visited and aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspection stations they've stopped at.
University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The Wisconsin First Detector Network (WIFDN) is a citizen science network that empowers people to take action against invasive species through invasive species monitoring, management, and outreach. WIFDN provides training and resources through a combination of webinars, instructional videos, and hands-on workshops, in addition to providing volunteer opportunities to citizen scientists. Consider becoming a First Detector and help improve our network to minimize the impact and spread of invasive species in Wisconsin.