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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Oregon Department of Agriculture. Plant Division. Noxious Weed Control.

See also: Oregon Noxious Weed Profiles for more species

Oregon Department of Agriculture.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The goal of this project is to raise awareness about invasive species and to turn that awareness into action to prevent and to manage current and future invasions. The project consists of lesson plans and corresponding hands-on items designed to teach the story about invasive species. Each lesson plan has been aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core Standards, and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards. Lesson plans in each module include activities for Grades 3-12.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

The Arkansas Department of Agriculture is pleased to announce the release of the newly created Arkansas Feral Hog Handbook, a guide to resources available in Arkansas to assist with feral hog control and eradication. The handbook includes contact information, websites, and brief explanations of the resources offered by state and federal agencies and other entities. "The Arkansas Feral Hog Handbook was made possible through a grant funded by the United States Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service. We appreciate their partnership and the information provided by other Feral Hog Eradication Task Force members to make the handbook a comprehensive educational resource for Arkansans," said Arkansas Secretary of Agriculture Wes Ward.

The handbooks are being distributed to the public at locations throughout the state with assistance from partner organizations, including the Arkansas Association of Conservation Districts, University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service, Arkansas Game and Fish, and Arkansas Farm Bureau. Copies of the handbook can be requested at lori.scott-nakai@arkansas.gov. An online version (2020; PDF | 4.48 MB) is also available.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture. Arkansas Forestry Commission (AFC).

The AR Forestry Division aims to maintain healthy, productive forest ecosystems by preventing, detecting, and suppressing damaging insects and diseases across all land ownerships.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.

Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

Montgomery County Department of Parks (Maryland). Park Planning and Stewardship Division.

Natural Resources Stewardship staff (NRS) has determined that many non-native invasive plants (NNIs) known to present a significant threat to the quality and biodiversity of the natural areas occur in this 37,000-acre park system. To support the park mission to steward these lands, Montgomery County Department of Parks has prepared fact sheets for park managers and maintenance personnel with easy-to-read information about mechanical and chemical control methods for several terrestrial NNIs.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.
A Notice of Final Action for the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations was published in the Maryland Register on Friday, February 3. These regulations went into effect February 13. The updated regulations add a total of four new species to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 lists established by the original invasive plant regulations (April 2016). Weed risk assessments are ongoing, and additional plant species will be added to the lists through the regulatory process as they are completed and approved. These science-based assessments are the foundation for decisions regarding a plant’s invasive status in the state. Full assessment reports are available on the Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control website.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the first spotted lanternfly hatch of 2020. The first instar nymph of the season was reported by a department employee while surveying for the pest in the upper northeast corner of Cecil County near the Pennsylvania border.

See additional resources on the Maryland Department of Agriculture's site for Spotted Lanternfly for up-to-date information. For questions related to the quarantine, permitting, treatment, or to report a sighting of the spotted lanternfly, especially outside of the quarantine zone, call 410-841-5920 or email DontBug.MD@maryland.gov. If you report a spotted lanternfly via email, please provide the location of the sighting and your contact information.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed that a single adult spotted lanternfly has been found on a trap in the northeast corner of Cecil County near the border of Pennsylvania and Delaware. This is the first confirmed sighting of the invasive species in Maryland, and the department does not believe there is an established population of the pest in the state. If you suspect you have found a spotted lantern fly egg mass, nymph, or adult, snap a picture of it, collect it, put it in a plastic bag, freeze it, and report it to the Maryland Department of Agriculture at DontBug.MD@maryland.gov.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Oregon Department of Forestry.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Forest Service.

See also: Invasive Plants and Insects Fact Sheets for additional species to help control invasive species in Maryland.