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Invasive Species Resources

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South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.
National Conference of State Legislatures.
National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks environment and natural resources legislation to bring you up-to-date, real-time information on bills (from 2015) that have been introduced in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Database provides search options by state (or territory), topic, keyword, year, status or primary sponsor. Topics include: Wildlife-Invasive Species and Wildlife-Pollinators.
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission.
Texas State Historical Association.
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.
The Invaders Program was initiated in 2005 to tackle the rise of biological invasions by harmful exotic species of plants and animals, with an emphasis on seven species of interest. Since then, the program has expanded to include a broad number of invasive species within the Sonoran Desert, hands-on research, and education to community members. Our goals are to identify the impacts of invasives in our region, map the spread of these invasives, collaborate with eradication projects, and educate others about the resulting implications to the Sonoran Desert.
Arizona Native Plant Society.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
Provides lists of sites for governmental members (U.S. state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies), North American members, affiliate members, and contributing members.
National Wildlife Federation.
This tool is designed to help you find the best native plant species to attract the butterflies and birds in your area (by zip code).
North American Native Plant Society.
Local Native Plant Societies are often your best source of information about plants native to your area.
Note: Provides information for State and Canadian Provinces.
North Dakota Weed Control Association.
Oregon State University. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC).
Through its county agents, the Cooperative Extension Service gives individuals access to the resources at land-grant universities across the nation. These universities are centers for research in many subjects, including entomology (the study of insects) and agriculture. Each county within the United States has an Extension office, which is staffed with agents who work closely with university-based Extension specialists to deliver answers to your questions about gardening, agriculture, and pest control.
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
State wildlife action plans outline the steps that are needed to conserve wildlife and habitat before they become more rare and more costly to protect. Taken as a whole, they present a national action agenda for preventing wildlife from becoming endangered.
See also: A national look at Species of Greatest Conservation Need as reported in State Wildlife Action Plans (DOI, USGS)
Environmental Law Institute.
This report reviews developments in state laws and regulations governing invasive species in eleven states. It finds that invasive species laws and regulations are often fragmented and incomplete and have developed primarily on a species-by-species basis in response to crisis. As a result, they often fail to address potential future invaders or close off known invasion pathways. Fortunately, states have begun regulating invasion pathways and identifying species that may become invasive in the future due to climate change or other factors. States are increasingly creating interagency councils and management plans to coordinate these novel invasive species responses.
Nature Conservancy.
The Nature Conservancy works across state borders to preserve natural areas throughout the United States. And, the Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.
Utah Weed Control Association.

Idaho Public Television.