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Invasive Species Resources

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Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.

Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
View current information on the locations of curlyleaf pondweed, Eurasian watermilfoil, and zebra mussels in North Dakota waters.
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is a significant nuisance for homeowners and can be devasting for farmers. Learn how to identify BMSB and how to report a sighting of BMSB (in all U.S. states/territories and several countries).
North Dakota State University.
North Dakota State University.

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

North Dakota Weed Control Association.
Google. YouTube; Alabama Forestry Commission.