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Invasive Species Resources

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Arizona Department of Agriculture.
Tennessee Valley Authority.
Last year, the TVA found water hyacinth in a slough near Scottsboro. TVA quickly partnered with the State of Alabama, bringing experts from both sides to start addressing the invasive water weed. Water hyacinth is bad news for Guntersville and other great fisheries in the Tennessee Valley. The plant can quickly outcompete other beneficial plants, often creating biological wastelands. Hartis and his team are asking the public to be on the lookout for hyacinth this summer. “If you see a [hyacinth] plant, pull it out of the water immediately and put it in the trash. We don’t want plants to float to a new area and establish a new colony.” If you find a large area of hyacinth, please report it to TVA's Public Land Information Center at (800) 882-5263 (between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Eastern).
Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.
A plant disease that presents a serious threat to the U.S. citrus industry has been detected in Alabama. Federal and state plant health officials have confirmed the identification of citrus greening (CG), also known as Huanglongbing or HLB, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This is the first confirmation of citrus greening in Alabama despite biannual surveys for the pathogen by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI).
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
North Dakota State University Agriculture and University Extension.
Truckee Meadows Weed Coordinating Group.
Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management.
Nevada Division of Forestry.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
Provides resource sheets and information on various aspects of the life of a forest that a landowner may need to understand the management of their lands. They generally describe various stages of the growth of a forest stand from: the selection of a tree species, site preparation, planting, growing the trees over time, thinning, pest management problems that might occur, wildlife considerations, and harvesting.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.
North Dakota State University. Extension Service.
Publication W1132
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
View current information on the locations of curlyleaf pondweed, Eurasian watermilfoil, and zebra mussels in North Dakota waters.
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.
The Invaders Program was initiated in 2005 to tackle the rise of biological invasions by harmful exotic species of plants and animals, with an emphasis on seven species of interest. Since then, the program has expanded to include a broad number of invasive species within the Sonoran Desert, hands-on research, and education to community members. Our goals are to identify the impacts of invasives in our region, map the spread of these invasives, collaborate with eradication projects, and educate others about the resulting implications to the Sonoran Desert.