An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 41 to 60 of 79

Search Help
Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.
See also: Species Factsheets for more fact sheets
Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
Alabama Forestry Commission.
North Dakota State University. Extension Service.
North Dakota State University. Extension Service; University of Minnesota Extension.
Mississippi State University. Extension.
Mississippi State University.
Mississippi Bug Blues is a project that seeks to educate the people of Mississippi about invasive species of insects that pose a threat to our state, its people, and its resources. The main responsibility of this campaign is to educate. Some species, such as the Emerald Ash Borer, have not been found in Mississippi yet, but are a threat because it has been found in several neighboring states. For other species, like the Red Imported Fire Ant, it is too late to prevent them from finding a way into Mississippi, but informing the public about how to avoid such species and control their population are also important.

North Dakota State University.

North Dakota State University.
North Dakota State University.
Mississippi State University. Extension.
See also: Publications Filed Under Poultry for more fact sheets
Mississippi State University. Extension Service.
This manual contains three types of activities. First there are introductory, or awareness-building, activities. The second type focuses on both beneficial and detrimental characteristics of exotics. And finally there are activities intended as reinforcers. The best advantage can be gained from this set by selecting at least one introductory activity and several from the second set and following up with routine monitoring of a nonindigenous species in your community.

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

North Dakota Weed Control Association.
North Dakota Department of Trust Lands.