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Invasive Species Resources

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Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program.
The Clean Boats, Clean Waters volunteer watercraft inspection program is an opportunity to take a front line defense against the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University.

University of Wisconsin - Madison.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

North Dakota State University Agriculture and University Extension.
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Since the emerald ash borer's initial introduction into the United States, it has been spread to many areas of the country by campers and homeowners who unknowingly moved infested firewood to uninfested areas where the beetles emerged and infested new ash trees. You can help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer into Kansas by not moving firewood across county lines. When buying wood for your home, buy only locally grown and harvested firewood. When camping, buy your firewood near your destination and burn all that you bring. If you suspect emerald ash borer on your property please call 785-564-6698 or e-mail your name, address, phone number and pictures of the suspect tree to ppwc@kda.ks.gov.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.