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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Oregon Invasive Species Council.

In 2010, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho launched a tri-state outreach campaign to inform the public about the dangers of moving firewood to Pacific Northwest forests. The campaign, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture, closely followed the messaging of the national Don't Move Firewood campaign, which recommends buy firewood that was cut locally, preferably within the county or region of where it will be burned. The tri-state outreach campaign, Buy It Where You Burn It, encouraged good campfire practices with branded posters, billboards, and playing cards located at rest stops and state parks.

Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council.

One of the keys to a rapid response to invasive species is the early identification of new occurrences. Please help report occurrences of invasive species in Minnesota. To report suspicious pest species arriving on plants or articles from foreign countries or other states, please contact the MDA's Arrest the Pest. To report invasive aquatic plants or wild animals, please contact the DNR Invasive Species Program at: 651-259-5100 (metro) or 1-888-646-6367.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture. Invasive Species/Noxious Weeds Program.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20.6 MB)

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Think you've found an invader? Oregon needs your help. Early detection is critical to keep Oregon protected from new invasives. If we can detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we save Oregon's natural resources and prevent costly eradication efforts. By the time an invader is easily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late.

Oregon Sea Grant; Oregon State University; DOC. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association.
Prepared for the Oregon Invasive Species Council. See also: Strategic Plans, Action Plans, and Annual Reports for more resources