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Invasive Species Resources

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Oregon Department of Agriculture.

See also: Weed Resources for more risk assessments

Utah State University. Extension.

Utah State University. Extension.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20.6 MB)

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.
Oregon State University. Extension Service.
A guide for homeowners, small woodland owners, resource managers, and conservation groups to recognize, prevent, and manage Sudden Oak Death.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Think you've found an invader? Oregon needs your help. Early detection is critical to keep Oregon protected from new invasives. If we can detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we save Oregon's natural resources and prevent costly eradication efforts. By the time an invader is easily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late.

Oregon Sea Grant; Oregon State University; DOC. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association.
Prepared for the Oregon Invasive Species Council. See also: Strategic Plans, Action Plans, and Annual Reports for more resources

Oregon State University. Extension Service.

The purpose of this publication is to alert Oregonians to the risk of introducing or dispersing invasive forest pests through firewood. Although Oregon law restricts the import of untreated commercial firewood, there still is a risk that people moving firewood will introduce or spread pests. Interstate transport of firewood by people is one of the most important avenues for dispersal of many invasive forest pests. See also: Forest Health, Insects and Disease for more publications.

City of Portland (Oregon). Environmental Services.

Oregon Public Broadcasting.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) have been added to the state noxious weed list. Palmer amaranth is an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp and was first found in the state last year. It has now been found in five counties. Houndstongue, which does not spread aggressively like Palmer amaranth, has been found in North Dakota since at least 1911 but infestations have tripled since 2008. It is now found in at least 25 counties. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on these and other noxious and invasive weeds is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/plant-industries/noxious-weeds.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of backyard exhibition chickens in Utah County, Utah. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Utah. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as three of the birds at the premises were recently moved to Utah from Los Angeles County, California. Since May 2018, 299 cases of Newcastle disease have been confirmed in Southern California, primarily in backyard exhibition birds.

Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products.

Utah State University Extension.

Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.

See also: Biting, Stinging, and Health-Related Insects for more species

Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects for more fact sheets
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species