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Invasive Species Resources

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New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Coastal Program.
Miami-Dade County (Florida); DOD. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; DOI. National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; South Florida Water Management District.
University of Florida. Entomology and Nematology Department.
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.
FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).
Florida Invasive Species Partnership.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Chesapeake Bay Program.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension; New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension; New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) was found in Worcester, MA in August 2008 and in Boston in July 2010. This insect pest poses a serious risk to trees and forests. ALB has not yet been found in New Hampshire. Help us by looking at the debris from your swimming pools. Whenever you clean your pool, look at the debris you collect in your filter and skimmers. Use this fact sheet (PDF | 1.22 MB) to compare collected insects to common insects. Upload pictures of any insect you think is a longhorned beetle.

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

University of Florida. IFAS. TAME Melaleuca.
TAME Melaleuca (collaborative effort between U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service and University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, South Florida Water Management District, and others)
Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area.
Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area.