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Invasive Species Resources

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Illinois Department of Public Health. Environmental Health Protection.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.
Ohio State University. Extension.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

USDA. Blog.

On September 12, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and its partners declared Monroe Township in Clermont County, Ohio, free of Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). This news came just months after APHIS declared Stonelick Township free of the beetle in March. ALB was first discovered in Monroe Township in August 2011. We think people unknowingly moved the beetle in firewood from Tate Township before anyone knew about the infestation there. Before long, adult beetles emerged and started infesting trees in Monroe. To stop this pest in its tracks, APHIS and state officials had to remove 1,186 trees in Monroe. They protected 4,614 other trees by injecting a pesticide directly into the trunks. It took 7 years, but after inspecting over 177,000 trees, APHIS and its partners finally confirmed the beetle is no longer there.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) have been added to the state noxious weed list. Palmer amaranth is an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp and was first found in the state last year. It has now been found in five counties. Houndstongue, which does not spread aggressively like Palmer amaranth, has been found in North Dakota since at least 1911 but infestations have tripled since 2008. It is now found in at least 25 counties. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on these and other noxious and invasive weeds is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/plant-industries/noxious-weeds.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing its plans for combatting the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio in 2020. "Just last year we declared eradication of ALB from Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, ending the city's 23-year-long battle with the beetle," said Osama El-Lissy, APHIS' Plant Protection and Quarantine Deputy Administrator. "This year, we've mapped out a sound strategy that will further our efforts to eliminate this pest from the remaining areas of this country where it still has a foothold."

Every year, APHIS evaluates and determines the most effective options to achieve ALB eradication. In 2020, the ALB program will focus on inspecting trees in quarantined areas in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio, and removing infested trees at no cost to property owners. The program will not apply insecticide treatments this year. In addition, program officials will monitor for the beetle’s presence inside and around each area, respond to service calls, conduct training sessions for compliance agreement holders, and perform outreach.

U.S. Department of Agriculture.
USDA Service Centers are designed to be a single location where customers can access the services provided by the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Rural Development agencies. This locator site provides Agency offices serving your area (by state and county).
University of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign. Prairie Research Institute. Illinois Natural History Survey.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Northern snakeheads (Channa argus), an invasive fish, have recently been confirmed in Delaware waters. Three adult snakeheads were collected from the Delaware portion of the Nanticoke watershed: Broad Creek in Laurel, Nanticoke Branch upstream of Seaford, and the Marshyhope at Woodenhawk. The Fisheries Section asks that any possible snakehead catches in any Delaware waters be reported by emailing a photograph and details to edna.stetzar@state.de.us
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
University of Illinois. Crop Science Extension.

University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.

Ohio State University. Extension.

Google. YouTube; United States Navy.

Google. YouTube; University of Guam. Sea Grant Program.
Google. YouTube; Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.

Google. YouTube; Smithsonian Channel.

Ohio Sea Grant College Program.
Provides information also for Quagga mussel