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Invasive Species Resources

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North Dakota Weed Control Association.
North Dakota Department of Trust Lands.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp, has been positively identified for the first time in North Dakota in McIntosh County. Palmer amaranth is native to the southwestern U.S. but was accidentally introduced to other areas and has devastated crops in the South and Midwest. It had not been identified in North Dakota until now. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on Palmer amaranth and other noxious and invasive weeds is available here. To report a suspect plant, contact the North Dakota Department of Agriculture at 701-328-2250 or North Dakota State University Extension at 701-231-8157 or 701-857-7677.
Tennessee Rules and Regulations.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
See also: Insect Pests for more pests.
University of Tennessee. Institute of Agriculture.
North Dakota State University. Extension Service.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture. Ellington Agricultural Center.
University of Tennessee. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Tennessee Invasive Plant Council.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.