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Invasive Species Resources

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Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
University of Wisconsin. Sea Grant Institute.

Polk County Department of Land and Water Resources (Wisconsin).

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. Division of Aquatic Resources.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
In 2016, Nebraska implemented an Aquatic Invasive Species Stamp to fund programs aimed at combating aquatic invasive species. Boaters who register their motorized watercraft in Nebraska will notice a $5 fee added to their three-year boater registration fee. Boaters who register their motorized watercraft in any other state will be required to obtain a $15 Aquatic Invasive Species Stamp each year that they boat in Nebraska. This stamp is available for purchase online. A temporary stamp may be purchased at some state parks and recreation areas.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
University of Hawai'i - Mānoa. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.