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Invasive Species Resources

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Michigan State University. W.K. Kellogg Biological Station.
Lesson plans are searchable using "invasive" as a keyword.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. 

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.
Each category includes relevant educational materials such as powerpoints, videos, and lesson plans that are helpful to educators in any classroom setting.
Hawaii Invasive Species Council.
Hawaii Invasive Species Awareness Month seeks to promote information sharing and public engagement in what the Hawaii State Legislature has declared "the single greatest threat to Hawaii's economy and natural environment and to the health and lifestyle of Hawaii’s people."
Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.
This curriculum provides background information, hands-on activities, worksheets and links to additional sites that teachers can utilize to engage students in formal and informal real-world settings. While some of the lessons build on previous learning, most of the lessons can stand-alone. IPM can be used as a theme in the classroom for an entire year, or as enrichment to regular classroom activities.
Massachusetts Introduced Pest Outreach Project.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln.
Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species; Hawai'i Invasive Species Council; Hawai'i Biological Information Network.

StoptheAnt.org.

Little fire ants (LFA) may be tiny, but they pack a powerful sting. Native to South America, these speck-sized invaders have hitchhiked across the Pacific, hidden in imported goods, establishing new populations in islands like Hawai'i. Much smaller than the average ant, LFA are about as long as a penny is thick. Little fire ants may have reached our shores, but we can't treat it like "just another ant." LFA are considered one of the World's 100 Worst Invasive Species (IUCN Invasive Species Specialist Group), because of their ability to reach very high numbers, to the point where people and animals can't avoid stings. It's up to each of us to Spot The Ant and Stop the Ant. Report little fire ants today.