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Invasive Species Resources

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North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Since the emerald ash borer's initial introduction into the United States, it has been spread to many areas of the country by campers and homeowners who unknowingly moved infested firewood to uninfested areas where the beetles emerged and infested new ash trees. You can help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer into Kansas by not moving firewood across county lines. When buying wood for your home, buy only locally grown and harvested firewood. When camping, buy your firewood near your destination and burn all that you bring. If you suspect emerald ash borer on your property please call 785-564-6698 or e-mail your name, address, phone number and pictures of the suspect tree to ppwc@kda.ks.gov.
PlantPono.org.
The Hawai'i-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment (HPWRA) is a free service that provides a background check on plants. Professional botanists use published information to answer 49 questions about a plant, to predict whether it is a low-risk or high-risk of becoming invasive in Hawai'i or similar Pacific islands.
University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources; USDA. Agriculture Research Service; Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

University of Hawaii. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Hawaii Biodiversity Information Network.

The Hawaii Early Detection Network was created to increase public awareness of invasive species and engage communities in the monitoring of their own neighborhoods. Find out how you help protect the environment of Hawaii by participating in the Eyes and Ears Team and attending an educational workshop or downloading your own field guide. If you are reporting a snake call 911 or for an animal call 643-PEST immediately!

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant. Center for Coastal Resources.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
View current information on the locations of curlyleaf pondweed, Eurasian watermilfoil, and zebra mussels in North Dakota waters.
University of Massachusetts - Amherst. Extension.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant. Center for Coastal Resources.
North Dakota State University.
North Dakota State University.