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Invasive Species Resources

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Massachusetts Introduced Pest Outreach Project.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
Pest alerts and other outreach from the Massachusetts Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey Program.
Massachusetts Invasive Plant Advisory Group.
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Arkansas Forage Management Guides for more factsheets

North Dakota State University.

North Dakota State University.
North Dakota State University.
USDA. FS. Alaska Region.
Partnering with a local Alaskan native community, the U.S. Forest Service has for the first time published a dual language booklet in English and a native Alaskan language, Yup'ik, to help educate the greater community in Southwestern Alaska on invasive species. This publication, Protecting Southwestern Alaska from Invasive Species: A Guide in the English and Yup'ik Languages, aims to explain invasive species concerns unique to Southwestern Alaska, which is home to a large community of the indigenous Yup'ik people.
Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
See also: Marine Invasive Species for more fact sheets

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

North Dakota Weed Control Association.
North Dakota Department of Trust Lands.
Oregon Department of Agriculture.
Arkansas Agriculture Department. Arkansas State Plant Board.
Oregon Department of Agriculture.

Oregon State University.

Although Asian gypsy moths are not established in Oregon, they were detected in the summer 2015 in Forest Park, North Portland and in Washington state. Since the Asian gypsy moth was just detected recently, we have a unique and small window of opportunity to ensure the population does not become established in Oregon. If we are able to terminate any early infestations of gypsy moth caterpillars that hatch this coming spring, then we can avoid the species establishing a population in our forest. To help respond to the AGM situation, the Oregon Forest Pest Detector program organized several AGM monitoring workshops in spring 2016 for community members and OFPD program graduates. You can also access the AGM presentation (PDF | 3.4 MB) from the workshop to learn more about the AGM management plan, egg mass identification, and visual survey.