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Invasive Species Resources

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Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Division of Agriculture.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
See also: Invasive Species Information for more resources
Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
In the U.S., spotted lanternfly is an invasive species that could be very devastating to some New Jersey crops and hardwood trees. In 2018, SLF populations were found in New Jersey and a state quarantine encompassing 3 counties has been established by the NJ Department of Agriculture. People and businesses travelling in and out of Mercer, Hunterdon, and Warren counties should inspect their vehicles for hitchhiking SLF as well as inspect outdoor items such as firewood, paving stones, lawn equipment, etc. for egg masses (see checklist (PDF | 222 KB)). Quarantine compliance will reduce the spread of SLF to new areas and counties thereby protecting New Jersey resources including forests and agriculture. To help survey efforts, please report sightings (with photograph) to slanternfly@njaes.rutgers.edu.
Washington Invasive Species Council.
The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states hope the hotline will help them eradicate and curb the spread of feral pigs and provide a better sense of the number of pigs here. See also: Agencies Encourage Reporting of Feral Swine (Nov 21, 2016). The Washington Invasive Species Council, Washington Department of Agriculture, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have issued a news release asking landowners, hikers, hunters, and other recreationists to report feral swine.
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) announced today that a single dead specimen of the invasive pest known as spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was reported and confirmed at a private residence in Boston. As a result, MDAR is urging the public to check for signs of spotted lanternfly adults in any potted plants that they may have received over the holiday season and to report any potential sightings of this pest on MDAR's online reporting form by taking photographs and collecting a specimen if possible. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings.
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association
Rutgers Cooperative Extension. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) have been added to the state noxious weed list. Palmer amaranth is an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp and was first found in the state last year. It has now been found in five counties. Houndstongue, which does not spread aggressively like Palmer amaranth, has been found in North Dakota since at least 1911 but infestations have tripled since 2008. It is now found in at least 25 counties. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on these and other noxious and invasive weeds is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/plant-industries/noxious-weeds.
Idaho Public Television.
Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
Idaho's inspection stations are placed on major highways at or near the Idaho state line. The purpose of these stations is to inspect watercraft coming from outside of Idaho. Inspectors will look for high-risk boats that have been in quagga mussel and zebra mussel impacted states. Boats will be inspected for any attached mussels and/or standing water and owners also will be asked where they have boated in the previous 30 days. It is important that boaters arrive in Idaho with a clean, drained and dry watercraft.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a disease that is identified by the telltale white fungus growing on the noses of some infected bats while they hibernate. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking the public to report the sighting of any active or dead bats during winter. Please call 208-454-7638 to report sightings. Idaho Fish and Game would also like to know of any sites that have hibernating bats so biologists can include them in the monitoring effort. Finally, the public is asked to not disturb hibernating bats and to respect cave closures.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
Google. YouTube; New Jersey Network (NJN) News Environment Report.
Google. YouTube; University of Idaho College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.
Google. YouTube; New Jersey Department of Agriculture.